International eMobility Standards Symposium

Share this article...Email this to someoneShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookShare on Reddit

The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) is collaborating with DIN (Deutsches Institut für Normung e. V.), the German Institute for Standardization, and SAE International in organizing a new event to explore how standards are driving innovation in electric vehicles (EV) and charging infrastructure globally, lessons learned from the field of “electromobility” standards implementation and gaps where standards are needed to propel the EV market to its next stage of growth.

The International eMobility Standards Symposium is scheduled to take place 18 February 2013 at the Hilton Anaheim, in Anaheim, California, USA.

The overall goal of the International P126218 eMobility Stnds 301x131eMobility Standards Symposium is to give attendees an understanding of how standards are driving innovation in the electric vehicle sector, what lessons have been learned from the field from implementing standards, the expectations for future developments, and where standards are needed to propel the electric vehicle market to its next stage of growth.

The target audience for the International eMobility Standards Symposium spans OEM design engineers; battery manufacturers; tier and component suppliers; product-design engineers for light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles; infrastructure suppliers (such as for charging stations); researchers; governments; utilities, and other Standards Developing Organizations.

The International eMobility Standards Symposium will take place the day before the SAE 2013 Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Technologies Symposium, also at the Hilton Anaheim and now in its tenth year.

Visit the International eMobility Standards Symposium Web site

Share this article...Email this to someoneShare on LinkedInTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on FacebookShare on Reddit

One Comment

  1. Posted February 6, 2013 at 1:09 pm | Permalink

    I think the level of autonomy will depned on the roads you drive on. If such a car becomes mandatory it’ll probably? not let you drive in San Francisco or a packed highway during rush hour (it’s not fun to drive in a traffic jam anyways), but It’ll most likely allow you to have full control on rural highways while keeping a safety bubble so that you cannot crash even if you try on purpose.